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Date: June 15th 1916
To
Rebecca
From
Robert
Letter

R. Hainsworth 117282 June 15 - 1916 Dear Rebecca - I was very glad to get your letter a few days ago & now I have a little time I will reply. Since last I wrote we have been through much. By now you will possibly have seen from the papers that the Canadians have been through some of the severest fighting & bombardment on record & when I look around my own Company I have to sigh for the touch of many a vanished hand & the sound of voices which are no longer heard. I never expected to come out alive & I never thought that a single man could possibly go through what we did & live so though I cannot say I am exactly happy I myself have much to be thankful for. I do not wish to say much about what we went through or endured. I believe if I reply to all your questions I shall have a letter. I do not think I agree altogether with Rev R J Campbell. I know a good many who do not swear drink smoke or take the Soldiers issue of rum. I believe I am pretty broad minded to suit a good many. When in Calgary I walked 14 miles to vote in favor of the Prohibition bill. Out here I would not try to stop the soldier from having his issue of rum. A day or two after coming out of the trenches after some very severe fighting we were handed some pamphlets headed "Dying on the battle field will not save you." I was badly riled when I saw it & I said to myself "Would the man who wrote that go thro' & endure, pain & suffering of the worst & then death like many of those I saw." "Would he give up everything for the sake of those at home who were helpless & in the cause of justness & rightness." I have seen men climbing over the parapet to bring in the dead & wounded & have fallen with a curse on their lips but I say what of it "They died for others." They made the biggest sacrifice & none of us are perfect. Speaking on bombing being dangerous work. It is supposed to be but there is not much to choose out here. I think the man who goes in the trench & handles the rifle takes as big a chance as any. At present we are billeted in barns away back from the front lines in a very beautiful part of the Country Crops look fine & strong & the hop fields are a sight but Alberta looks first as good to me & a good deal better. Shap must be a nice place for a holiday. I hope your Father felt the benefit of a change. I hope you will forgive me for not enclosing recipe for cake, I can't remember it. I always made it from the recipe. When I come home I'll make you one if you will be satisfied with that. I guess you are saying "He surely must be a regular American bluffer." I met a fellow just lately in our Coy by the name of Birnie. He comes from Gretna & says he know you. He will be up that way soon as he got wounded last time we were in & is now in England. I do not think it is serious but would like you to call on him if you would. I know he would be glad to see you for I know him well. I think I will close now with best wishes to you all. Yours very sincerely Robert Hainsworth

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